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20130104
20130112
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MSNBCW 6
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Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >>> at the heart of barack obama's presidency is a commitment to civil rights. he always represented the ideas of justice, equality and opportunity. and he never forgot where he came from. remember senator obama's famous speech in selma? >> but something is stirring across the country because of what happened in selma, alabama because some folks are willing to march across the bridge. don't tell me i'm not coming home when i come to selma, alabama. i'm here because somebody marched for our freedom. i'm here because your sacrifice for me. i stand on the shoulders of giants. >> one of the giants he's talking about was dr. martin luther king, jr. and today, we'll learn about a powerful tribute the president has that the world will see. stay with us. at a dry cleaner, we replaced people with a machine. what? customers didn't like it. so why do banks do it? hello? hello?! if your bank doesn't let you talk to a real person 24/7, you need an ally. hello? ally bank. your money needs an ally. my ex-girlfriend... 7th grade math teacher. who is this? that's pete. my... [ dennis' voice ] allstate agent. a
senator tim scott hammered by the naacp. the group says he doesn't believe in civil rights. well, that senator is now firing back. the governor sticks around to talk about that. >> plus, getting your hands on pot could soon be a button away. next to hit stores. marijuana vending machines. [ male announcer ] kids grow up in no time... marie callender's turkey breast with stuffing is a great reason to slow down. creamy mash potatoes, homestyle gravy and 320 calories. marie callender's. it's time to savor. >> republican senator tim scott was sworn in yesterday as first african-american senator in more than three decades. slamming the newly elected lawmaker on civil rights. senator scott is firing back. listen. >> we have republicans who believe in civil rights. you know, unfortunately he is not one of them. and unfortunately his party as you know has really gone after so-called rinos as they call them. these republicans who believe in civil rights again and again. >> i think that it's tcontinue a nation. if you really think about where we are, we have the most diverse freshman class
and high capacity magazines has become a violation of basic civil rights on par with the racist era of jim crow, and anyone who suggests that it is indeed time to ask whether 30-round clips makes society safer is deemed a traitor to his party. >> mark the date. it isn't going to be long before moderate republicans start going on television to push the notion that guns are hurting republicans with independent voters and women. the moderate, spineless, linguine-spined republicans it isn't going to be long as this controversy heats up. you know, they wilt. >> this outcry is no longer about a difference of opinions regarding what we need to do to keep the nation's children safe. it has become, instead, a rally to amass and protect an arsenal of battlefield grade weapons, ones that may be needed to fend off a government intent on instituting an oppressive dictatorship. >> 1776 will commence again if you try to take our firearms. >> as ousted tea party congressman from illinois joe walsh said yesterday, we may have to shed blood every couple hundred years to preserve our freedoms. bloodshed, acc
. during the civil rights movement he was kind of a hero of mine. much more so than martin luther king, because i was quite of a radical as a young person, and i was the one that thought we should shall overcome is not a effective way of gaining civil rights. i think i i thought that more confrontation was needed. >> host: what made you a radical? what does it mean? >> guest: i think a radical, -- i'm still a radical today. that is i believe that a radical is any person who believes in the official liberty and individual freedom and limited government. that makes you a radical. and i have always been a -- person who believe that people should not we are interfere with me. i should be able to do my own thing as long as i don't violate the rights other people. >> host: who is the difference of following malcom x. omar tin luther king? >> host: well, at that time i thought martin luther king was too much a compriseer. i was willing to demand people in my career in the army was a part of that vision of confronting racial discrimination. >> host: how tall are you? >> guest: six foot fight.
with on a number of issues, still many feel that gay rights like marriage equality is a civil rights issue. the "talk back" question for you today, should we welcome pastors in the public square despite their views on homosexuality. facebook.com/carolcnn, facebook.com/carolcnn. or tweet me at @carolcnn. i'll be right back. >>> good morning. thank you so much for being with us, i'm carol costello. time to check the top stories. >>> the federal government wants to give boeing's newest airline another look. the department of transportation will conduct a comprehensive review of the boeing 787 dreamlin dreamliner's critical systems including design, manufacturing, and assembly. the federal government says the aircraft are safe to fly. the 787 has had a pretty difficult week, though, incidents include a fire that started in the battery compartment of a japanese airliner and a fuel leak in another japan airlines jet. >>> afghan president hamid karzai arriving at the white house minutes ago for a one-on-one meeting with president obama. the future of u.s. troops in afghanistan topped the agenda.
active as civil rights laws. so it influences private law. so there could be a market for privacy. so they come along and say we will make it easier for you. and then facebook had to modify things and so forth. so what i am suggesting is a type of touchstone. before i buy an iphone, i give consideration to all the security. anywhere you go on the web, when it's not protected -- if you think about things like that the people might hold as private. >> you do a lot of coverage around the intersection of technology. does this seem like a real step forward to you? can you talk about your reaction? >> well, i think it speaks to the problems at this point. a lot of judges interpret the law around these technologies and don't always understand the technology. many have found that there are expressions are under around her e-mail and law enforcement can only get that technological issue straightened out. many would say that it is upsetting. in terms of trying to apply everything -- i mean, the constitution is supposed to have businesses not be able to look at a facebook page when they are maki
slaves and you're quite right, he never intended to free them, even if he had been in debt. but he did argue that to do so would be civil war and that the only solution would be a colonization scheme in which all slaves moved, whether it be the caribbean, west are back to africa. and of course you could argue that was just self-justification. but it's also a reason worth considering. i came at this very differently. as a scholar working on the british caribbean. these are some of the most brutal regimes anywhere. i was very aware that it never bothered about tomorrow's issue of slavery, never discussed it before and during the american revolution. the first place it's really discussed us here in america. and even perceives british abolition debate. and to be remarkable if slave regimes throughout history, but it's only in the western only in the 18 century that you have abolition movement, people actually questioning the morality of slavery. so to me, jefferson was remarkable in that he actually questioned the sysadmin had in us empathy to realize that slaves freed with these so angry
and corporate america isn't somehow reined in, there will be massive civil disobedience in this country. >> host: all right, john, we got your point. thank you. mr. barlett, response for that caller. >> guest: well, there's a lot there. and you could, you could do a whole book on the federal reserve. actually, bill greider a few years ago did a really fairly decent job on the federal reserve. one thing that i've learned over the years is don't talk about something you haven't spent any time studying. and so i just don't know. is that a fruitful area to look at? absolutely. and especially when you look now, because now it's being driven home to me that you can have massive debt without high interest rates, which is something i didn't think would ever occur. i'm talking about the federal government. because if you went back, you know, back into the greenspan era, the government interest rate, the government was paying 16, 17%. and you kept, you keep looking at the size of this growth, and you say, wow, this is impressive, 2, 3%? i don't know. i don't know what the -- i don't know how that's explai
crowd? it's almost like the civil war went the other way, and the south somehow took over the party of lincoln, not that there's anything wrong with the south, but it's certainly made your party into a right wingish party. >> well, we're not going to be a national party of social conservatives basically destroyed any possibility of people in the northeast from getting elected who are republicans. it's just not going to happen. it's not the fiscal side that's of concern to people up north. it's their social agenda, which has nothing to do with running the country. >> did you ever read the republican platform this year? you ran for office this year. did you take a look at some of the stuff in there about outright -- >> chris, you know that no congressman ever has read the platform whether they're conservative or liberal. it's the most irrelevant document, but ultimately it can hurt some people who, you know, when others read it. it doesn't tell us how to vote. it's useless. >> i read it once in a while with great pleasure because it's so absurd. it is. howard fineman, i don't know who
string. so there's a balancing act here as the clock winds down. >> i think that's right. i don't think we're looking at a second and third-string problem at this point. jack lew is by any measure a first-string civil servant. but i think your broader point is correct. you think about the bush administration. you saw hank paulson come in at treasury, bob gates at defense. i think both proved to be important in their roles. that doesn't need you need quite the same changeover. one lien is that the predecessors were considered failures. tim geithner's tenure has been controversial but i think broadly speaking what he did to write the financial system will be considered a tremendous achievement in the annals of economic policy-making. but again, they are in something of a rut, i think, in their economic policy-making at this point, and particularly in their approach to dealing with republicans. a lot of that, i'd say frankly the bulk of that blame falls on the house republicans and john boehner. but it's nevertheless a case that they just put somebody into the treasury department who they
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)